Initiatives of Two Institutions:

As a consortium, we have a diverse group of students and faculty. We are proud to draw upon the unique cultures and initiatives of our two institutions: Norfolk State University and Old Dominion University.

  • We Are O.N.E.
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EVMS Students
Students at
EVMS
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    Founded in 1930 as a Norfolk campus of The College and William and Mary, Old Dominion University now operates independently as a large, diverse public university. Just under half of ODU’s over 24,000 students are white; and nearly one-quarter have military affiliation. VCP students receive academic, clinical, and research training at ODU.

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    Founded in 1935, Norfolk State University provides VCP students academic and research opportunities at a mid-sized Historically Black College/University. A public university, NSU has approximately 5,300 enrolled students, about half of whom commute from off campus.

Diversity Committee
Our Mission

The Diversity Committee exists to cultivate an atmosphere of inclusion and mutual respect that highlights and celebrates diversity within the Virginia Consortium and the broader community. We recognize that such an atmosphere is not an end-state but rather an ongoing process and an attitude to be embodied and enacted by our faculty and students both personally and professionally.

Who We Are

The committee is made up of faculty from both NSU and ODU and at least 1 representative from each cohort

Initiatives




Research and Practice
Our faculty and students are conducting research and practice that impacts at-risk communities and marginalized groups. Click the buttons below to view some examples.
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Dr. James
PAULSON

Family
Development


VCPCP Faculty Diversity Spotlight

MEET Dr. Kristin Heron:
Since joining the ODU faculty in 2014, my research interests – which have primarily focused on body image, eating behaviors, and other health behaviors in young women – have been extending to include an emphasis on these experiences and behaviors in diverse and marginalized populations. In particular, through collaborations in the department I have become interested in understanding factors that contribute to minority women reporting higher rates of disordered eating behaviors than majority group women. In this work, our research team considers different minority groups, including racial/ethnic minorities and sexual minorities (i.e., individuals who identify as lesbian/gay, bisexual, queer, etc.). Over the last few years, with my undergraduate and graduate students and collaborators, we have conducted several studies regarding college student health where we pay particular attention to how minority students’ experiences may be similar or different from majority students.
In 2019 I received a grant from the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities, a division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to examine health disparities in binge eating among heterosexual and lesbian young women.
An important component of this study is to examine how sexual and racial minority identities (i.e., being a black lesbian or queer woman) may intersect and contribute to health disparities. The overarching goal of this work is to use our findings to inform the development or adaptation of body image and/or disordered eating treatment programs for minority women that are more carefully tailored to fit women from diverse backgrounds’ unique experiences and needs.

IT'S OUR COMMITMENT

The Virginia Consortium Program in Clinical Psychology is committed to cultivating an atmosphere of inclusion and mutual respect that highlights and celebrates diversity within the Virginia Consortium and the broader community. The Program is dedicated to increasing the recruitment and retention of students, faculty, and staff underrepresented in Psychology, and welcoming academic perspectives from historically marginalized groups. The Program also strives to advocate for and support the interests of individuals from all races, sexes, gender identities, gender expressions, sexual orientation, religions, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic backgrounds, physical and mental abilities, and residency statuses. The Program is committed to training students to work competently and effectively within a multicultural society. Accordingly, the Program works to promote diversity in all teaching, research, and services activities as well as in clinical training and mentoring. In fulfilling this commitment, VCPCP is dedicated to an ongoing effort to foster an atmosphere of inclusion and mutual respect. We strive to address social problems and respond creatively and compassionately to the challenges facing our local, state, national, and global communities. We recognize that such an atmosphere is not an end-state but rather an ongoing process and an attitude to be embodied and enacted by our faculty and students both personally and professionally.